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for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true.ufd scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation.
the government's massive surveillance program. this after a new bombshell from the nsa. nbc news capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell has all the details. >> reporter: it's a brief new look inside the secrets of the nsa. the director of national intelligence released several documents to show fisa court oversight of the spy program that sweeps up americans' phone records data. the government has acknowledged using a wider net than previously known. in what's known as hop analysis, the nsa tracks a call made by a terror suspect, but can then track all the records linked to anyone the first suspect calls and then to each of those contacted. senator dick durbin was clearly uneasy. >> when you look at the reach of this program, it envelops a substantial number of americans. >> reporter: frustration between senators and the intelligence community, starting with how nsa leaker edward snowden was ever granted access to the country's most guarded spy programs. senator patrick leahy dismayed that no heads have rolled at the nsa. >> if a 29-year-old school dropout can come in and take out massive
of the law and rev lauelations on the nsa program that can spy on everything you do online and i mean everything and the nixon you haven't seen until now. footage hidden for the last 40 years. tonight i'll talk to the other nixon, the 83-year-old brother ed. >>> i want to begin with ariel castro said to make a statement tomorrow. pamela brown spoke to castro's sister today and joins me now. pamela, i poured through the new documentation that's been released this evening, very, very disturbing revolutions. much of it based on diaries from the three poor women held captive by ariel castro. tell me about that. >> reporter: yeah, that's right. you remember all the counts, more than 900 counts ariel castro faced and specific with the dates. we're learning that prosecutors actually used these women's diaries to help them document all the different charges. according to these documents that the prosecutor's office released today, the women over the past ten years got through their time in captivity by keeping diaries and writing about abuse they experienced and their dreams of getting out so
>>> the nsa's deputy director faces tough questions about edward snowden today. the former head of the nsa out front to respond. let's go "outfront." >>> the national security agency under fire again for its spying programs. today the obama administration declassified and released three documents outlining the phone and internet data collection programs. right before that agency's deputy director faced tough questions on capitol hill about edward snowden. >> for a 29-year-old school dropout to come in and take out massive, massive amounts of data, it is obvious that there weren't adequate controls. has anyone been fired? >> no, sir, not yet. >> who double checked snowden? >> there are checks at multiple levels. there are checks at moments when a person might be doing at any point in time. >> obviously failed. >> outfront tonight general hayden who ran the nsa until 2005. he's also the former director of the cia. general, thank you very much for being with us. i want to start with the back and forth that you heard there. obviously as you heard and nearly half a million private co
online. nsa surveillance, glen greenwald who broke the story today joins me next. [ man ] look how beautiful it is. ♪ honey, we need to talk. we do? i took the trash out. i know. and thank you so much for that. i think we should get a medicare supplement insurance plan. right now? [ male announcer ] whether you're new to medicare or not, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. it's up to you to pay the difference. so think about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, they help cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. i did a little research. with a medicare supplement plan, you'll be able to stay with your doctor. oh, you know, i love that guy. mm-hmm. [ male announcer ] these types of plans let you visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. and there are no networks. is this a one-size-fits-all kind of thing? no. there are lots of plan options. it all depends on what we need and how much we want to spend. [ male announcer
his case to lawmakers to keep the nsa's spying capabilities alive. >>> major league baseball prepares to hand out suspensions toll more than a dozen players for their involvement in the sport's latest performance-enhancing drug scandal, and the game's highest paid player could be facing a lifetime ban. >>> and george zimmerman surfaces. the neighborhood watch volunteer acquitted of murdering trayvon martin has a minor brush with the law. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs thursday, august 1st, >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, august 1st, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this afternoon, the growing debate over privacy over national security moves to the white house. president obama meets with a bipartisan group of lawmakers to discuss the national security agency's sweeping surveillance program. meanwhile the british paper that first revealed the program has published documents that appear to show the nsa can sift through e-mails, online chats, and browsing histories to just about any american without a warrant. and dur
. thank you, steve. >>> it is 7:11. edward snowden is on the move. what finally caused the nsa leaker to leave the moscow airport and what we know about his new locations. >>> and more shocking demands by san diego's mayor. why his lawyers are still insisting the city pay his legal fees. the house, you couldn't just set up a tv in the basement. i mean, come on! nope. we could only watch tv in the rooms that had a tv outlet. yeah if we wanted to watch tv someplace else, we'd have to go to my aunt sally's. have you ever sat on a plastic covered couch? [ kids cheering ] you're missing a good game over here. those kids wouldn't have lasted one day in our shoes. [ male announcer ] add a wireless receiver. call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. with qualifying bundles. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings. well we can help with that. we tend to do a lot of banking online. you play? yeah discover a mobile app that lets you bank more freely... and feel
for the nsa but people employed at private contractors that are deployed to the nsa like mr. snowden. they can sit at their desk and there is not even a supervisor within the nsa before the process looks at what they are doing let alone a court which means they are free to engage in all kinds of searches. there are legal limits of what they can do when it involves a u.s. person. although a lot of u.s. persons communications are in these databases. there is no technological restraint or after the fact robust auditing process and there's all kinds of evidence emerging because of disclosures of abuse. there's a lot of proof that if you allow surveillance without limits it will be wildly abused and i think that's why even in washington these stories are making such an impact. >> i want to bring in james risen, a journalist with the new york times and knows all about questions of the nsa and freedom of the press. you can't discuss specifics of the ongoing case and senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. james risen, what do you make of his latest exposure by edward snowden in terms of the kind of prog
with tattoos, people without tattoos. >> we did notice that -- anyway, railing against nsa surveillance, he spoke out against lindsey graham with some help from the crowd. >> one of the senators, and we won't name any names, who's republican, from a state just south of north carolina -- he said that he didn't care if we censored all of the mail. that's scary. that's pretty scary. >> well, it's not just graham who's watching his back from this part of the party. today on capitol hill, conservative groups including the tea party patriots, the club for growth, heritage action and citizens united are holding an event demanding for a vote to defund obama care. called a litmus test for all republicans. >> those of us who are republican, those of us who claim to be against obama care, who happen to vote to fund it, will have a lot to pay, will have a lot to answer for, with our constituents. >> another group that will be at today's capitol hill event, for america. they're up with a video that singles out republican leader mitch mcconnell, calling him a chicken for not joining those republican forc
. >>> good evening, from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in" nsa leaker edward snowden leaves the moscow airport behind and enters russia with temporary asylum. what does it mean for his future? and for the already tense, fraught relationship between the united states and russia? >>> also tonight, you probably know who this tony bennett is, but there's another tony bennett who should be way more famous than he already is. thanks to an outrageous story of apparent corruption that you need to know about. >>> plus, mitch mcconnell has long lived by the old adage, slow and steady wins the race, but news out of kentucky should make the republican senate leader, too slow and very, very unsteady. >>> we begin tonight with a story that i honestly and frankly did not think would be topping our broadcast. today ariel castro was was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years after pleading guilty to 937 counts including rape and kidnapping of three women, two of whom an suggested as teenagers and one of whom gave birth to his daughter during captivity. this may have been a routine proc
tonight, does the nsa have your number and web history and e-mails just a key stroke away? new reporting says yes and reveals the classified software they use to access that and more. we're joined by a lawmaker who wants to remain in the agency and is there a bellyache in this bag. an ugly stomach bug is linked to contaminated bugs of salad. why aren't they saying which brand to avoid? we'll invest get that. >>> in rehab racket, we've been telling you this week what a year-long investigation for the center of investigative reporting reveals about a program that's costing us money, big money. the investigation documents how california's federally funded medicaid system, midical paid out $94 million, again, your money, in the past two years to drug clinics that show signs of deception or questionable billing practices. among scams, billing for phony patients, drug treatments never provided or treatments the patient didn't need. in one case the patient was dead. it's truly staggering stuff. drew griffin tried to get answers from officials but no one would talk on camera. instead, they could
the nsa can monitor you without a warrant. >>> game over for a-rod? the yankees slugger reportedly negotiating a settlement. how long he could be forced to sit out. >> long, long. >> long time. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm michael pereira. >>> up first today, it's sentencing day for ariel castro, the ohio man who kept three women imprisoned in his home for at least a decade. castro pleaded guilty last week to more than 090 counts including murder and kidnapping. it was a deal that spared him a possible death sentence and we're expected to hear from one of castro's victims. as new details emerge from this decade of horror. >> reporter: prosecutors failed a sentencing memorandum thursday detailing how he kidnapped amanda berry, gina dejesus and the abuse they endured. they kept a diary. castro also admitted to having the girls chained by their ankles with only one meal a day, showering infrequently. while he had sexual lu assaulted them. he said that he had other victims but some of them made it home and others had not. castro pleaded
for a bundle. in some cases for patients that don't exist. >>> also tonight, does the nsa have your number and web history and e-mails just a key stroke ahead? new reports says yes and reveals the classified software they use to access that and more. we're joined by a lawmaker. >>> later, is there a belly ache in this bag? health officials say they've traced a stomach bug to contaminated bags of salad. the question, why aren't they saying which brands to avoid? >>> keeping them honest, and getting results. we've been telling you all this week what an investigation with the center for investigative reporting reveals about a program that's costing all of us big money. our investigation documents how california's federally funded medicaid system paid out $94 million, again, that's your money, in the past two years to drug clinics that have shown signs of deception or questionable billing practices. among the apparent scams, billing medical for treatments patients didn't need. in one case, because the patient was dead. it's staggering stuff. for weeks, our correspondent drew griffin tried to g
finally going on record. also tonight, does the nsa have your number and web history and e-mails just a key stroke away? new reporting says yes and reveals the classified software they use to access that and more. we are joined by a lawmaker who's part of a bipart ann effort to rein in the agency. is there a belly ache in this bag? health officials say they have released an ugly bug in to contaminated bags of salad. why aren't they saying which brand to avoid? we have our series rehab racket. we have been telling you what a year long investigation reveals about a program that's costing us money, big money. our investigation documents how california's federally funded medicaid system medical paid out 94 million disease in the past two years to drug clinics that have shown signs of deception or billing practices. among the scams billing for phony patients, drug treatments never provided or treatments the patients didn't need. in one case because the patient was dead. it is staggering stuff. for weeks, our investigative correspondent drew griffin tried to get answers from officials but n
beginning 9:00 a.m. eastern. >>> nsa's top secret surveillance programs under fire. president obama and a bipartisan group of lawmakers are going to hold a closed door meeting at the white house to discuss privacy as another edward snowden bomb shell is dropped detailing how much the intelligence agency is spying or could be spying on your internet activities. barbara starr with more on this. new revelations. how is the administration responding to it this time? >> this meeting at the white house may be a sign that the administration is willing to change the program but is not going to give up on it. the obama administration under attack for its surveillance programs. national security agency director keith alexander heckled. >> i haven't lied to congress. >> reporter: while congress questions is the nsa spying on us. who is accountable for edward snowden's leaks? >> anyone asked to resign or offered to resign? >> no one. >> reporter: the administration declassified more documents in an effort to show the surveillance is vital to national security. even as a new article unveiled mor
searchs claims about another nsa program and the response from the white house. >>> an ohio ariel castro. and holding three women hostage for ten years. what else is expected to happen in that courtroom. >>> good morning. traffic on 237 looks good. more about the morning commute ahead. >>> 5:14. and sentencing day for kidnapper ariel castro he helped three -- held three women captive for ten years. prosecutors will tell us more about his daily assaults on amanda berry. michelle knight and gina dejesus. and it is from entries found in diaries they were keeping. they are out to prove that he a monster. he is the worst of the worst. he is a -- the most violent predator that can be offered. the victims will be difference a chance to speak. castro will be giving a long statement about his life saying who he is. it could take up to four hours. and he will be serving life in prison plus a 1000 years that's all part of a plea deal. >>> we have developing news in the case of edward snowden. he has left the airport in moscow and entered russia. he just received papers granting him a one year tempo
edward snowden temporary asylum. the self-professed nsa leaker got the proper documents to leave. he is in an undisclosed location this morning. and while it might help the former contractor this morning, jim aceda is joining us. what are the implications for what has happened with the whole snowden scenario? >> reporter: good morning, betty. the snowden situation has strained difficult relations between the united states and russia. the u.s. does see the snowden asylum as a slap in the face really. the question now is how far is the obama administration willing to go to embarrass putin by boycotting the g 20. obama and putin plan to have one-on-one talks in moscow before the g-20. the white house is hinting to cancel that. he spent his first night in freedom as an official refugee. his lawyer says that he's staying in the home of an american expat family, that he's learning russian and wants to get a job to support himself. not in information technology. he's more interested in becoming a human rights activist. back to you. >> very interesting. thank you very much. we'll watch that
at moscow's airport ed snowden on the move for the first time. the nsa leaker is said to leaving the airport officially entering russia after granting temporary asylum. vladmir putin has made a move. i'm bill hemmer. welcome here to "america's newsroom." you have come back for more. >> i decided to try another day. i'm heather childers in for martha maccallum. snowden has been in limbo at the moscow airport since june 20 third. the u.s. wanted russia to send him back home to face prosecution for spilling secrets about the u.s. surveillance program. instead russia granted him a year of asylum. bill: we wonder what is next. greg palkot live in london. there are a lot of rumors that he could go to cuba or venezuela. what is the latest there, greg. >> reporter: hello, bill and heather. by our calculations about an hour 1/2 ago he left his limbo status there at the terminal at the moscow airport. edward snowden the nsa leaker, is now traveling into russia. traveling to an undisclosed location according to his lawyer. indisclosed because of security concerns. he also, we have just learned, traveli
this is not a positive development. >> after a month in the moscow airport, nsa leaker edward snowden leaves and disappears. >> it could be the most interesting google search ever setting sail from san francisco for the dead zone. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? today. karen caifa (kay-fuh) report >>> nsa leaker edward snowden can stay in russia for a year. the country granted him temporary asylum today. karin calf fa reports the white house is not happy. >> reporter: asylum is approved. this is his attorney showing his document. the move ends more than a month of limbo in moscow's airport. snowden has legal status in russia for a year. the white house needless to say was not happy. >> we have extremely disappointed i
. a check of the numbers coming up. and this morning n-s-a leaker edward snowden was finally able to leave the moscow airport after being held there for more than a month. details on why he was released, coming up. >>darya:a second bart strike is looming as union contracts are set to expire on sunday night sending union workers back to the picket line, and leaving hundreds of thousands of bay area commuters stranded come monday morning. kron fours mike pelton is live at west oakland where negotiations are set to fat resume today. good morning mike. >>: here you can see bart and its labor unions by now you know when of the biggest issues on the two sides are pay increases. they want to offer any percent raise but the workers are asking for a 21 percent raise over the same period with his three years. both sides said both proposals they receive financial we don't make sense. they have agreed to meet each day this week and hopes to find some common ground. >>: until we make progress on both a safety proposals that the union has advanced to which the district has had no response and to t
of russia, putin has granted nsa leaker edward snowden temporary asylum. a full year he can stay there now. that means snowden who criticized our country now gets to live under a government that's not much big on freedom. >>> finally, the speech queen elizabeth never wanted to write, never wanted to give, and we never wanted to hear. it's about nuclear war, what could have been said to us. this is "hardball," the place for politics. t tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. bounce is great because the freshness lasts for weeks in the drawer. why can't everything stay fresh that long? [ male announcer ] how do you get your bounce? [ man ] lasting freshness. >>> here is some news. we may have a race on our hands out in connecticut. let's check the "hardball" scoreboard. according to a new ppp poll, allison lundgren grimes leads senate majority leader mitch mcconnell by a point. one thing to note about this, it was commissioned by the progressive change campaign committee, a democratic grou
granted nsa leaker edward snowden temporary asylum. a full year he can stay there now. that means snowden who criticized our country now gets to live under a government that's not much big on freedom. >>> finally, the speech queen elizabeth never wanted to write, never wanted to give, and we never wanted to hear. it's about nuclear war, what could have been said to us. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> here is some news. we may have a race on our hands out in connecticut. let's check the "hardball" scoreboard. according to a new ppp poll, allison lundergan grimes leads senate majority leader mitch mcconnell by a point. one thing to note about this, we always do this, it was commissioned by the progressive change campaign committee, a democratic group. and we'll be right back. >>> surge on the right or a coup? ted cruz and his allies have hijacked much of the republican agenda. those divisions have cruz's fingerprints all over them. and that includes the fight over defunding obama care. cruz, along with mike lee, marco rubio and others are all urging their senate colleagues t
>> live from the kgo-tv broadcast center this is abc7 news. >> breaking news at 6:00. n.s.a. leaker, edward snowden, leaves the moscow airport. his lawyer reveals his new location. >> only four days until a second possible bart strategic. today's union employees will try to rally support from the public. >> in ohio, the man who held three women captive for a decade in cleveland will learn his fate from a judge, with sentencing for ariel castro in minutes. >> thanks for joining us. >> it is looking different this morning. >> the extra sunshine from yesterday spilled over the clearness overnight with clouds just now coming back. why think they will hang around along. it is dry this morning. no drizzle. no mist. our day planner around the bay, clouds are gathering and temperatures are holding in the low-to-mid 50's. we will be in the low to mid-60's by noon and cleaner air today with blue in the sky rather than the haze and 70. low-to-mid 60's in the evening. next it will hours inland, temperatures are 56 but there are areas in the north bay in the 40's with temperature around 70 at no
in which he blamed his addiction, blamed the fbi, blamed just about everybody except himself. plus, the nsa leaker and fugitive ed snowden walking free in russia, after more than a month holds up in an airport there. now some u.s. lawmakeres are calling roche's move, quote, a slap in the face. >> we are awaiting a bombshell that could rock major league baseball. officials set to hand down punishment in the steroid scandal and it could be big trouble for a-rod, the highest paid player in the history of the game, all of that straight ahead unless breaking news changes everything. >>> first from fox at 3:00. there was harmony in the house where he held three women captive in chains for more than a decade, and the sex he had with them was mostly consentual. those incredible claims from ariel castro in court today as he faced one of the three survivors of his abuse who told him his time in hell is just beginning. all of that before big sentenced to life in prison no life of parole. and today relatives of the victims telling the court how those women are greg stronger each day, and then the third
to talk about the nsa, russia, trayvon martin, hillary clinton 2016. the barriers, the way that we think about what slots fit in the media and how politicians use those, i don't think the obama white house thinks in those. i frankly don't think a lot of people who consume what we do think in those terms. i think this is a reflection of that. >> not at all. jay asked very good questions, jonathan. this was another example because there was so much news out there that the president has not been heard on. >> i'm sorry, andrea. i thought you were talking to cliff. in picking up on what chris was talking about. the president fielding questions from a late night talk show host instead of the white house press core, the president is not only picking his interviewer but picking his awed yejs. he's trying to leap frog us in the media and washington media and talking to the american people directly. in your intro the president will probably do a press conference before he goes on vacation, so i think what the president is doing is sort of an all approach. we'll talk to the press core in the white
the nsa. this afternoon the president is meeting with a group of lawmakers about the controversial surveillance programs that collect phone records and emails. they are members of the intelligence committee or senators with specific concerns about the issue. and it comes as momentum is growing against the nsa security agency program. last night the security chief was heckled at a conference in las vegas. >> think what you're saying is that in these cases what's the decision, where is the discussion, and what tools should we have to stop those? >> you lied to congress. why would we believe you're not lying to us now. >> haven't lied to congress. >> hours earlier senators questioned intelligence officials about how the program success run and if it's invading americans' privacy. >> we could have more security if we stripped searched everybody that came into every building in america. we won't do that. we'll have more security if we close our borders to everybody. we're not going to do that. you worked together on a bill to rein in the nsa. thank you for being with us. you just saw th
. >> there's a chase that mr. snowden now has. what's he going to say? >> nsa leaker edward snowden leaves the moscow airport. >> snowed beden was issued temporary asylum in russia for a year. >> has been holed up at the airport for more than a month. >> if snowden is allowed to stay in russia, the white house is not going to be happy about this. >> ariel castro the cleveland man who held three women captive for a decade will be formerly sentenced today. >> castro prepared to apologize -- >> league officials have told the players union which players -- >> espn reporting alex rodriguez is negotiating a lengthy suspension to avoid a lifetime ban. >> members of congress head to the white house today to voice their concerns about the government's massive surveillance program. >> new information leak, about the nsa's ability to monitor pretty much everything you do online. >> george zimmerman's been spending a little time in texas. >> pulled over outside of texas while carrying a gun. >> what a coincidence. >> overnight, it became legal in two more states for gay co
the moscow airport. what washington worries that the nsa leaker's asylum will ground relations with russia. we'll discuss the latest chapter in the snowden saga and the russian ballet with the "new york times" david sanger joins us next on "now." hey, it's me, progressive insurance. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with great discounts like safe driver, multicar, and multipolicy. so call me today. you'll be glad you did. cannonbox! [splash!] ♪ it guides you to a number that will change your life: your sleep number setting. it will give you the soundest sleep you've ever had. it's a bed so intuitive it even knows you by name. now it's easier than ever to experience deep, restful sleep with our advanced dualair technology you'll only find in a sleep number bed. at the simple touch of a button, the sleep number mattress adjusts to your ideal level of comfort and support, with exceptional pressure rel
nsa contractor, edward snowden, has granted a years asylum in russia. this has strained relations between moscow and russia. president obama is under pressure to retaliate. an upcoming summit is in question. >> this was the moment this afternoon when edward snowden wearing a black rucksack with his back to the camera climbed into a car and disappeared into russia, the biggest country in the world. he had been stuck in limbo in the transit zone of the airport. he insisted he would not go to america to face trial. me aht, his lawyer showed copy of the document that grants him polit asylum in russia for at least a year. he said that he is in a hotel but he would not say where. >> the question of his security is obviously very important. a great powers trying to catch him. the name of the power is the united states of america. >> edward snowden himself said over the past eight weeks, we have seen the obama administration show no respect for international or domestic law but in the end, the law is winning. this evening, however, russia's longest serving dissident pondered whether he kn
summit with russia's president. snowden who admits leaking details about nsa programs is wanted in the united states to face espionage charges. no word on where he is tonight. his attorney says his location will be kept secret for security reasons. the temporary asylum can be extended indefinitely. >>> perfect controversy. sales of "rolling stone's" magazine with the alleged boston bomber doubled over last year. the magazine featuring dzhokhar tsarnaev was boy cocotted by stores, but the magazine has doubled its sales from a year previous. the boston bomber killed two people on the initial day and another officer later. more than 260 were also injured, including a 12-year-old boy. >>> the clock stuck 12:01 this morning and gay marriage became legal in two more states, minnesota and rhode island. they're the 12th and 13th u.s. states to recognize same-sex marriages. in minnesota, you see it here, couples began exchanging vows at midnight with the mayor of minneapolis officiating. the national gay rights group freedom to marry estimates that about 30% of the u.s. population now li
granted edward snowden temporary asylum. the self plof fessed nsa leaker finally got the proper documents to leave. he's in an undisclosed location this morning. it might help the former contractor to avoid charges here but a diplomatic crisis is still stewing. jim, the g-20 summit is coming up next month. what are the implications to consider? >> reporter: there's no question that snowden's release has strained already difficult relations between the united states and russia and that the united states clearly see the snowden asylum as a slap in the face. the question is just how is the obama administration willing -- how far is it willing to go to hit back and embarrass president vladimir putin? now boycotting a major event like the g-20, which takes place in early september still seems unlikely to observers. however, obama and putin plan to have talks in moscow just before the g-20 meeting and the white house is already hinting it may cancel that meeting in protest. meanwhile, the american fugitive spent his first night in freedom as an official refugee in russia after almost six weeks
the republicans are going to have a debate here about the role of government, both at home and abroad. the nsa spying, the surveillance, has that dpoen too far and are we getting involved in too many wars. >> before you get to that, you're seeing this what appeared to be just a personality conflict here and name calling. you heard chris christie say i'm not calling any names, but you heard it from the various sound bites from rand paul, so that p upstages any issues that would be the discuss, wouldn't you think is this. >> christie threw down the gauntlet first saying libertari libertarianism was a bad idea and christie of course has this reputation for tough talk and i guess paul has shown he's not going to back down from that, but i think they will move away from the personal jabs and we need to have a debate on the role of government, how far do we go in surveillance and spying and those sorts of things and we haven't had that debate. >> somehow, it seems people will have to get on track if that has to be the mantra. so how do you get to that point if there becomes this fighting of persona
dianne feinstein will be meeting at the white house about the nsa surveillance. we're live in the news room now with more on the meeting today and news of another secret program. >> reporter: dave, the same reporter who releasing specifics on another program. the guardian's glen greenwald said that with the xkeyscore it collects as much activity as it can and search teams used on the internet. the nsa assured lawmakers that are tiny fraction are looked at by officials. and the chairman of the judiciary committee determined whether the patriot act allows this. >> based on the secret interpretation every statute that does not appear to authorize those. and it will be next. >>> with the head of the nsa toll about reading e-mails when i see you next. >>> live in washington. a lawyer has ignited the latest controversy in the scandal. it should foot the bill against the harassment lawsuit. the lawyer says that's because the mayor never received state required sexual harassment training. the council voted to deny the mayor money for his defense. >>> there is a new development in the scandal h
. >>> walking free, despite warnings from the u.s. not to do it. russia has given a home to nsa leaker eard snowden and the showdown with the u.s. just got worse. >> new parts. the choice millions of us are making to get out of chronic knee pain and get new ones installed. tonight, dr. nancy snyderman on one of the most popular surgeries for americans. some who put it off for far too long. >>> and making history. a woman who has already broken barriers now on the verge of going where no woman has ever gone before. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. as it unfolded in court today, in cleveland, ohio, a live television audience was allowed to see a man who has been described as a monster, who for over a decade held young prisoners in his home. and during his long and rambling remarks in court, he said he was sick and he appropriated the language of the addiction treatment culture to paint himself as a victim. as he tried to contend the girls he kept chained up in his home were somehow content. it was tough to watch at times especially when one of his brave victims spoke. now he will
is at the courthouse. bob orr on russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. major garrett has white house reaction. that cyclospora outbreak has made hundreds sick, but where is it coming from? >> i don't know what to buy. i don't where to go eat. >> schieffer: dr. jon lapook has the latest on the investigation. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the cour
. >> and the nsa leaker edward snowden in moscow goes free. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who? meghan, my coworker. who? seriously? you've met her like three times. who? (sighs) geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. how'd you d9 out of 10.iz today? 9 out of ten? that's great. ♪ nothing says, "i'm happy to see you t
. this on the heels of news from earlier today that after the longest layover in recent airline history, nsa leaker edward snowden was today granted temporary asylum in russia. this means that he's allowed to finally leave the moscow airport terminal that's been his home sing arriving from hong kong on june 23rd. snowden left the airport with temporary refugee at that time tuesday for one year, allowing him to move freely within that country. his exact whereabouts are being kept secret, but needless to say the reaction from many in washington is one anger and disappointment. >> mr. snowden's actions have hurt the ability of our country to protect our citizens. i would hope that president obama would engage president putin on this issue and resolve it in a way that's satisfactory to the american people. >>> joining us is representative jim moran, a democrat from virginia. good afternoon, sir. >> good afternoon. >> your colleague chuck schumer said earlier, quote, russia has stabbed us in the back and each day mr. snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. do you share mr. schumer
with members of congress to try to allay concerns about the nsa program. part of the reason congress is so upset about is because they didn't know about it--until edward snowden told them. that's the definition of a whistle blower. forget us, even congress didn't know. now the white house is turning around and saying look, look, i see you're all upset. but the guy who let you know about the nsa program, and you and your representatives know about the nsa programs, the russians, i can't believe they're hiding him. we need to get that guy. screw that, snowed den, run, don't come to the this country. are you nuts? >> i wish he could prove that it was not espionage but it was whistle blowing, but our system is broken in mean ways and we saw that with bradley manning. what you were saying before, saying that he was a coward, this is a very, i think, a sad emotional appeal to get people turned against him. they can't point to actual damage done, they have to hope that labeling him a coward wil,d just like they like to label leaker as pedophiles and sexual predators, things like that. >> i think
the nsa, coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets, and saying it was signals intelligence? >> sure, first to fran's point it's totally true this is one of many and one piece of information in a broad collection that the u.s. intelligence community has engaged in. this meeting was significant according to officials and reports in both "the new york times" and lots of other outlets because it was where the vague discussion of inpending attack was discussed and if you look at the embassy closings around the world it matches the people on the call. so you can sort of understand why the u.s. government took such a broad approach. as for it being motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. some of them they take risks on. as far as some of the other reporters linking this to the nsa and know den and what have you, it's important to point out the programs disclosed by snowden are not related to this particular communication particularly intercepted. they are about collecting information, domestically and it's not really connected. so i think
to justify. if we are monitoring calls that that is okay with the nsa. you say three unnamed u.s. officials. as you know you come under criticism today. intelligence and national security reporter for the "l.a. times" say those officials want to help the nsa. since when have they started disclosi disclosing intercepts. >> first of all, i like him very much. he is a great reporter. i these were not authorized disclosures. they were following the report that reported the intercept. when you are dealing with intelligence bureaucracies there are these leaks and the press you know we all sort of cover things. and this, i think, our story was really prompted more by the initial disclosure and trying to get more resolution ont that. i would also add another important point here. the nsa programs that have become so controversial have nothing to do with any kind of intercepts and capabilities that would be in this particular case. i think they are two very distinct things. it is a testament i think to the capabilities of the u.s. intelligence community but i don't think this is any bearing on the p
were using you to either justify the nsa coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets and saying it was signals intelligence. >> sure. first to fran's point. it is true it is one of many threat streams and one piece of information in a broad mosaic of a collection that the u.s. intelligence community is engaged in on a regular basis but the meeting was significant according to officials and reports in the "new york times" mcclatchy and other outlets because it is where the vague discussion of impending attack was discussed. if you look at the embassy closings around this world it largely matches the people who were on the call according to to our reporting. you can understand why the u.s. government took a broad brush aproechl as for it being their motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. i would say some communications they hold closely. some they take risk on. this seems to be a risk they didn't take as far as other reporters linking it to the nsa and snowden and what have you. it is important to point out the programs disclosed by
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